first_imgNew England Patriots wide receiver Michael Floyd adjusts the strap on his helmet during NFL football practice, Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2017, in Foxborough, Mass. (AP Photo/Steven Senne) Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling 0 Comments   Share   Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact Top Stories center_img Floyd says he is sticking to a football-only lifestyle. He told The Boston Globe he’s not even visited the city of Boston, spending all of his time at Gillette Stadium, the Patriots’ practice facility and his hotel room nearby.“I like it. It’s kind of a place for me. Not too many things to do around here. That’s good for me,” Floyd said.…“I’m not into going sightseeing. I don’t really care. I’m here for one reason.”He doesn’t want to talk about the arrest. When asked if he has had a drink of alcohol since coming to New England, Floyd ended the interview. Before that, he said he’s living a simple life right now.“I kind of act like I’m broke, so, that’s how I am,” he said. “I can really actually just focus in on football and I can get to work in less than three minutes, so I really like it.”Floyd was arrested early on Dec. 12 for falling asleep at a stoplight in Scottsdale following Arizona’s return from a trip to Miami. Police recorded a blood alcohol content of 0.21.The team released Floyd two days later and he was claimed off the waiver wire by New England.That week, Bidwill indicated the team was unhappy with how Floyd showed little remorse for his DUI arrest and also that the receiver had previously shown signs of lacking focus when it came to football. Former Cardinals receiver Michael Floyd isn’t getting out much following his December DUI arrest.As his New England Patriots prepare for a playoff game against the Texans, it instead sounds as if Floyd is taking the advice of Cardinals president Michael Bidwill. Following Floyd’s arrest and release from Arizona in December, Bidwill criticized Floyd’s “approach” and said the Cardinals’ lesson to be learned was to “pay attention to your profession seven days a week.” The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo “We asked him to proactively address this, we had multiple conversations with him, with his agent, they just didn’t want to do that,” Bidwill said on Dec. 18. “We decided, you know what, we’re moving on.“I hope he gets healthy. I like him personally,” Bidwill added. “He’s a great kid. I was really disappointed with how he handled this and you know, how he was handling his approach to the game, his approach to conditioning and approach to things, and I think it was affecting him, some of his issues were affecting him on the field.”last_img

admin | 3216976577@qq.com

Related Posts

first_imgNo related posts. At a time when everything in the prevailing culture seems to be focused on getting and greed, me and mine, here comes Bill Pfeiffer with a gift – for individual seekers, for humanity and for the Earth.For years, Pfeiffer has been a frequent visitor to and passionate admirer of Costa Rica. During many happy hours here and in Siberia, where we traveled with him on two unforgettable journeys, we learned about his vision for the world, honed over a lifetime of humble eagerness to learn, gutsy single-mindedness, and a helpless love for the Earth and all her inhabitants.Bill Pfeiffer walks his talk, impeccably. “Wild Earth, Wild Soul: A Manual for an Ecstatic Culture,”his first book, is the inspiring result.The self-described “maverick deep ecologist” founded and for more than 20 years operated the not-for-profit Sacred Earth Network. Its activities included sponsoring visits to indigenous elders in America and Siberia and arranging exchanges among them.Using everything he learned from these encounters plus a lifetime of searching and study, Pfeiffer evolved the Wild Earth Intensive – a 10-day spiritual adventure that guides participants to rediscover their wild souls – the real selves buried beneath the trappings of contemporary cultural brainwashing. (Writer and teacher Martín Prechtel, initiated as a shaman by the Tjutujil Maya, calls this essential self the “indigenous soul”; Andean master Américo Yabar, who transmits the spiritual teachings of the Q’ero elders of the high Andes, calls it the salk’a [wild, undomesticated] spirit, and insists that all the ills of contemporary life are the result of “disconnection from Pachamama [Mother Earth].”)Pfeiffer believes that “wisdom and brilliance are encoded in every human and can be unleashed under the right circumstances,” and that the “severe amnesia” which has cut us off from Nature and our fellow beings can be reversed. Through the Wild Earth Intensive, as we remember who we really are and what we’re doing here, our wise, brilliant selves make themselves known. This deeply transformational experience is the heart of Pfeiffer’s book. In elaborate detail, with practical, step-by-step instructions, he explains how an Intensive unfolds and how the process becomes a blueprint for a healthy, harmonious and hopeful way of living. He notes, “A WEI does not impose a belief system but inspires a belief in Life.”The Wild Earth Intensive is based on seven principles:There is power in remembering ancestral wisdom.We can dream a new world into being.We are a tribal species.The Earth is alive and full of meaning.Humans naturally live in abundance.Women and men are partners in a common destiny.Ancient wisdom is mirrored by 21st century science.With copious references to myriad works by ancient and contemporary thinkers, teachings from many spiritual traditions, and cutting-edge New Paradigm science, Pfeiffer devotes a section of the book to explaining each principle, then goes on to detail its application.He shows how ancient techniques such as the talking circle, meditation, storytelling, ceremony, and shamanic journeying – all part of a Wild Earth Intensive – help participants rediscover forgotten life skills that are “hard-wired” in everyone and crucial for survival: humanity’s and the planet’s. Participants find themselves remembering the importance – and, ultimately, the joy and relief – of such things as listening, feeling, playing, and sensing Nature’s rhythms, energies and messages.“It is a wonderful paradox that a WEI, while providing a nurturing container where we don’t lose our individual uniqueness and emotional stability, strengthens our sense of interconnection with each other and the universe,” Pfeiffer writes. “Participants come to recognize or develop their particular gifts and see how they enrich the group and, eventually, the larger community. We experience personal empowerment though activities that make us feel safe enough to be authentic: to be ourselves and to think for ourselves.”“The premise is that this place of wholeness, connectedness, and gratitude is where wise actions, healthy lifeways, and sustainable cultures grow,” he adds. “It is the wisdom of the Earth herself, flowing through each of us, that can provide the clearest direction for the way ahead.”It’s an intensely optimistic – yet not utopian – view. We are not trapped in the mess we’ve made; we can change direction; it’s not too late.  Recovering lost wildness naturally sows the seeds of a joyous, peaceful and loving world.  Pfeiffer’s book provides all the tools we need to find our way back … and forward. It’s a gift of hope.“Wild Earth, Wild Soul” is available for $15.65 ($7.69 in Kindle edition) from Amazon.com. Facebook Commentslast_img

first_img 5 ways to recognize low testosterone “Brazil is a very decentralized state, in which states and municipalities have total autonomy,” Abramo said. “At that level you can have total confusion. The lack of administrative competence is widespread.”In the case of Guapimirim, one family, of which the mayor was part, has held control for years. According to court documents, city council members received monthly payments of up to $35,000 to support the reigning coalition.During the Sept. 7 holiday weekend, groups in dozens of cities across Brazil are planning marches to call for clean government.Carla Zambelli, organizer of one of the group, NasRuas, or InTheStreets, says marches are expected in 69 cities.Among their specific demands are the end to secret voting in the legislature and justice in the cash-for-votes trial involving the governing Workers’ Party that is currently before the Supreme Court. In that case, the party is accused of illegally paying legislators a monthly stipend to support government projects.“Brazil is among the countries that pay the highest taxes, but our security, education and health services are terrible,” said Zambelli. “We agree with paying taxes, but we want to see it come back to us in services.” Construction begins on Chandler hospital expansion project Authorities said 11 other suspects also were indicted in a scheme that investigators allege illegally siphoned off at least $24 million in public funds over four years. The charges include fraud, corruption and racketeering.The investigation is not an isolated case, prosecutor Antonio Campos Moreira said at a news conference.“We have a number of similar investigations looking into city halls,” Moreira said.Brazil, which has long ranked toward the bottom of Transparency International’s Corruption Perception Index, has been taking steps to improve accountability and practices in government. In the past few years, the government has created oversight bodies such as the CGU, which audits and promotes transparency in the executive branch, and the CNJ, which oversees the judiciary.Seven members of President Dilma Rousseff’s Cabinet have given up their posts or were pushed out following corruption allegations.These efforts have been largely concentrated at the federal level, however, with very little happening at the state and municipal levels, said Carlos Abramo, head of Transparencia Brasil, a group not connected to Transparency International that focuses on anti-corruption efforts. Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvement Associated PressRIO DE JANEIRO (AP) – Four politicians were arrested and three others were being sought in an anti-corruption sting in a Rio de Janeiro town, officials said Wednesday, describing it as an example of other operations that are under way.Among the seven arrested or sought were the mayor, the leading candidate for mayor and the head of the city council in Guapimirim, a working class town of about 52,000 people in the foothills of Rio de Janeiro’s mountains. Top Stories Sponsored Stories center_img Comments   Share   Bottoms up! Enjoy a cold one for International Beer Day Patients with chronic pain give advice (Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) Mary Coyle ice cream to reopen in central Phoenix How men can have a healthy 2019last_img

first_imgThe tropical island of Sri Lanka, formerly known as Ceylon, has a long reputation for natural beauty, historical monuments and exotic allure. To truly capture that unique combination, Amanresorts has created a four-night Fort & Beach Journey that combines the best of the rich and varied dimensions of Sri Lanka’s colorful southern coast. On this sojourn, guests can combine the discovery of 400-year-old Galle Fort – a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the home to Amangalla – with the balmy seclusion of a palm-fringed golden beach at Amanwella.The trading port of Galle was the gateway to the Orient in the 19th century, with throngs of passengers disembarking from steamers daily and wending their way through narrow streets and exotic bazaars to what was formerly the Oriental Hotel in Galle Fort which, in its new incarnation as Amangalla, has been restored to capture the genteel ambience of the bygone era. A two-hour drive to the east, the beachfront retreat of Amanwella – set amid a mature coconut grove near the village of Tangalle with suites featuring individual plunge pools and terraces – is the perfect place to unwind with the option of day trips to visit historic rock temples or spot wildlife in Sri Lanka’s national parks.www.amanresorts.comlast_img

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *